LIBRARY RESOURCES


Toronto Public Library System: The catalogue is searchable online. Books, articles, films and other materials from any branch can be reserved online for delivery to your local branch. The TPL will, on request, seek from other libraries materials not owned by or missing from its own collections. Interlibrary loan requests can also be made for a circulating copy of a book or other material if TPL's copy is for use in library (reference) only.

Toronto Reference Library: Located steps away from the Yonge-Bloor subway station. While most materials are for use in library only, the library offers a wide variety of materials, including books, periodicals, newspapers and electronic resources - plus videos, musical scores and pictures for loan.

U of T Library System: The catalogue of the 12 million volumes held by Robarts and the system's other 43 libraries is searchable online. The general public is permitted to consult any of the materials on site. Retired faculty and librarians can access the Robarts stacks and take books out from any library in the system for free. Alumni can get the same privileges for $70-$95/year ($145 for non-alumni) or for lifetime stack access but no borrowing privileges, for a one-time payment of $25. If you live near the Scarborough or Mississauga campus, materials can be ordered for delivery there.

Media Commons: The catalogue is searchable online. Holds a large collection of audio-visual materials that can be consulted by the general public on site and taken out by U of T library card-holders.

York University Library System: The catalogue is searchable online. The general public can access the stacks and consult the holdings on site. Retired faculty and librarians can take books out for free. Others can secure borrowing privileges for an annual fee ($25 for alumni, $100 for others). If you don't want to make the trek to Keele and Steeles, books can be ordered for delivery at the Glendon campus at Bayview and Lawrence.

Ryerson University Library System: The catalogue is searchable online. The general public can access the stacks and consult the holdings on site. Retired faculty and staff take books out for free. Others can secure privileges for an annual fee ($50 for alumni, $75 for others).

TIFF Film Reference Library: Located in the TIFF Bell Lightbox at King and John Streets, the library has an extensive collection of films, books, magazine and scripts. The holdings are accessible by the general public and staffers are pleased to help visitors locate materials. The catalogue and all materials must be consulted on site, however.

Note:
  • Approaching a library's reference desk for assistance can save you a great deal of time.
  • The Great Courses university lectures at the Toronto Public Library and the U of T Library System can be taken out by anyone with book borrowing privileges at those libraries.
  • Because of licensing restrictions, the electronic resources of the university libraries must generally be consulted on site. Check with the library.
  • Google Books, an online digitized and hence word-searchable collection of the books in the world's greatest libraries, can be a handy way to locate books relating to your topic. To access it, on the Google home page, click on Apps, More and then Books.